Meet ‘The Mooch,’ Your New White House Communications Director

Anthony Scaramucci is the new White House Communications Director, and like many Trump hires before him, he arrives with a televised history of trashing his new boss. From ThinkProgress:

“I don’t like the way he talks about women, I don’t like the way he talks about our friend Megyn Kelly, and you know what, the politicians don’t want to go at Trump because he’s got a big mouth and because [they’re] afraid he’s going to light them up on Fox News and all these other places,” he said. “But I’m not a politician. Bring it. You’re an inherited money dude from Queens County. Bring it, Donald.”

This was in 2015, a year before the money manager began supporting Trump’s bid for president. But like all Trump hires, there’s almost nothing Scaramucci has said in the past his new boss will hold against him. As White House Communications Director, this is helpful indicator of how reliable their future statements will be, too.

Sean Spicer is apparently not a fan. He has now resigned because of Scaramucci’s hiring, and Vanity Fair reports that Scaramucci also had a strained relationship with White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and former Apprentice contestant Omarosa Manigault. As Jessica Pressler wrote in a New York magazine profile in January, Scaramucci (nickname “The Mooch”) “is well liked,” but “the Mooch, like the Fonz, has never been taken particularly seriously.”

When, to everyone’s disbelief, Donald Trump actually won the presidency and became someone to take seriously, so did Scaramucci. Since the election, Mooch’s stock has been way up: Yahoo Finance named him its “Wall Streeter of the Year,” despite the fact that his flagship fund had been performing poorly over the past two years. He has been a constant presence at Trump Tower, squiring bigwigs to meetings with the president-in-waiting. When I found him mixing a margarita for himself in an empty bar downstairs at the Hunt and Fish Club, his face still waxen with makeup after a day on TV, he told me it’s about to go even higher.

Pressler’s profile quotes an acquaintance calling Scaramucci “a momentum guy,” who “saw it was working and he hopped on.” He made a brief appearance a few weeks ago in March Leibovitch’s New York Times Magazine feature “This Town Melts Down,” when Scaramucci was still in search of a job. In the five minutes he spends with Leibovitch, who is interviewing Corey Lewandowski, the Mooch thanks Lewandowski for “that thing at the White House today,” writes Leibovitch. It was “the first of four times he would thank [Lewandowski] in the five minutes that we were together.”

Now, it appears, it will be others who are thanking Scaramucci. What does the Mooch do when momentum swings the other way? As he said in his first press briefing this afternoon, “If you want to eat an elephant, you have to eat it one bite at a time.”

Read the story


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/07/21/meet-the-mooch-your-new-white-house-communications-director/

The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week, we’re sharing stories from Abrahm Lustgarten, Lois Beckett, Julia O’Malley, Alice Driver, and Sarah Jeong.

Sign up to receive this list free every Friday in your inbox.

* * *

1. Open Burns, Ill Winds

Abrahm Lustgarten | ProPublica | July 20, 2017 | 38 minutes (9,692 words)

An in-depth report on how munitions plants across America continue to irresponsibly dispose of bomb and bullet waste by “open burning.” The practice, banned 30 years ago, still takes place nearly every day under a permit loophole, putting millions of pounds of toxic chemicals and pollutants into the air, essentially poisoning residents and the environment.

2. The Town Where Everyone Owns a Gun

Lois Beckett | The Guardian & Topic | July 14, 2017 | 20 minutes (5,000 words)

After the mine closed nearby, and the residents started to move out of Nucla, Colorado, the town passed an ordinance that every household in the municipality was required to own a gun. But as the residents see it, their main enemy is Telluride, the liberal city next door.

3. The Teenage Whaler’s Tale

Julia O’Malley | High Country News | July 17, 2017 | 12 minutes (3,000 words)

For a teenager in the Siberian Yupik village of Gambell, killing a whale would be a rite of passage, and entry into manhood. But then, Chris Apassingok, age 16, was targeted with online harassment for his kill, and the town of 700 felt the weight of an internet pile-on tear through the community.

4. Brick By Brick

Alice Driver | Arkansas Life | July 1, 2017 | 9 minutes (2,417 words)

In telling stories of the wood-fired kilns her father made by hand over the years, Alice Driver reminds us of the risks and rewards inherent in creative pursuits and the deep personal satisfaction that comes from the effort and sweat you put into your craft.

5. The Selfie Monkey Goes to the Ninth Circuit

Sarah Jeong | Motherboard | July 13, 2017 | 7 minutes (1,804 words)

Can a monkey be an “author” under U.S. copyright law? PETA forges ahead with a claim on behalf of Naruto the macaque, and Sarah Jeong walks us through the details.


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/07/21/the-top-5-longreads-of-the-week-179/

The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week, we’re sharing stories from Abrahm Lustgarten, Lois Beckett, Julia O’Malley, Alice Driver, and Sarah Jeong.

Sign up to receive this list free every Friday in your inbox.

* * *

1. Open Burns, Ill Winds

Abrahm Lustgarten | ProPublica | July 20, 2017 | 38 minutes (9,692 words)

An in-depth report on how munitions plants across America continue to irresponsibly dispose of bomb and bullet waste by “open burning.” The practice, banned 30 years ago, still takes place nearly every day under a permit loophole, putting millions of pounds of toxic chemicals and pollutants into the air, essentially poisoning residents and the environment.

2. The Town Where Everyone Owns a Gun

Lois Beckett | The Guardian & Topic | July 14, 2017 | 20 minutes (5,000 words)

After the mine closed nearby, and the residents started to move out of Nucla, Colorado, the town passed an ordinance that every household in the municipality was required to own a gun. But as the residents see it, their main enemy is Telluride, the liberal city next door.

3. The Teenage Whaler’s Tale

Julia O’Malley | High Country News | July 17, 2017 | 12 minutes (3,000 words)

For a teenager in the Siberian Yupik village of Gambell, killing a whale would be a rite of passage, and entry into manhood. But then, Chris Apassingok, age 16, was targeted with online harassment for his kill, and the town of 700 felt the weight of an internet pile-on tear through the community.

4. Brick By Brick

Alice Driver | Arkansas Life | July 1, 2017 | 9 minutes (2,417 words)

In telling stories of the wood-fired kilns her father made by hand over the years, Alice Driver reminds us of the risks and rewards inherent in creative pursuits and the deep personal satisfaction that comes from the effort and sweat you put into your craft.

5. The Selfie Monkey Goes to the Ninth Circuit

Sarah Jeong | Motherboard | July 13, 2017 | 7 minutes (1,804 words)

Can a monkey be an “author” under U.S. copyright law? PETA forges ahead with a claim on behalf of Naruto the macaque, and Sarah Jeong walks us through the details.


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/07/21/the-top-5-longreads-of-the-week-179/

The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week, we’re sharing stories from Abrahm Lustgarten, Lois Beckett, Julia O’Malley, Alice Driver, and Sarah Jeong.

Sign up to receive this list free every Friday in your inbox.

* * *

1. Open Burns, Ill Winds

Abrahm Lustgarten | ProPublica | July 20, 2017 | 38 minutes (9,692 words)

An in-depth report on how munitions plants across America continue to irresponsibly dispose of bomb and bullet waste by “open burning.” The practice, banned 30 years ago, still takes place nearly every day under a permit loophole, putting millions of pounds of toxic chemicals and pollutants into the air, essentially poisoning residents and the environment.

2. The Town Where Everyone Owns a Gun

Lois Beckett | The Guardian & Topic | July 14, 2017 | 20 minutes (5,000 words)

After the mine closed nearby, and the residents started to move out of Nucla, Colorado, the town passed an ordinance that every household in the municipality was required to own a gun. But as the residents see it, their main enemy is Telluride, the liberal city next door.

3. The Teenage Whaler’s Tale

Julia O’Malley | High Country News | July 17, 2017 | 12 minutes (3,000 words)

For a teenager in the Siberian Yupik village of Gambell, killing a whale would be a rite of passage, and entry into manhood. But then, Chris Apassingok, age 16, was targeted with online harassment for his kill, and the town of 700 felt the weight of an internet pile-on tear through the community.

4. Brick By Brick

Alice Driver | Arkansas Life | July 1, 2017 | 9 minutes (2,417 words)

In telling stories of the wood-fired kilns her father made by hand over the years, Alice Driver reminds us of the risks and rewards inherent in creative pursuits and the deep personal satisfaction that comes from the effort and sweat you put into your craft.

5. The Selfie Monkey Goes to the Ninth Circuit

Sarah Jeong | Motherboard | July 13, 2017 | 7 minutes (1,804 words)

Can a monkey be an “author” under U.S. copyright law? PETA forges ahead with a claim on behalf of Naruto the macaque, and Sarah Jeong walks us through the details.


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/07/21/the-top-5-longreads-of-the-week-179/

The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week, we’re sharing stories from Abrahm Lustgarten, Lois Beckett, Julia O’Malley, Alice Driver, and Sarah Jeong.

Sign up to receive this list free every Friday in your inbox.

* * *

1. Open Burns, Ill Winds

Abrahm Lustgarten | ProPublica | July 20, 2017 | 38 minutes (9,692 words)

An in-depth report on how munitions plants across America continue to irresponsibly dispose of bomb and bullet waste by “open burning.” The practice, banned 30 years ago, still takes place nearly every day under a permit loophole, putting millions of pounds of toxic chemicals and pollutants into the air, essentially poisoning residents and the environment.

2. The Town Where Everyone Owns a Gun

Lois Beckett | The Guardian & Topic | July 14, 2017 | 20 minutes (5,000 words)

After the mine closed nearby, and the residents started to move out of Nucla, Colorado, the town passed an ordinance that every household in the municipality was required to own a gun. But as the residents see it, their main enemy is Telluride, the liberal city next door.

3. The Teenage Whaler’s Tale

Julia O’Malley | High Country News | July 17, 2017 | 12 minutes (3,000 words)

For a teenager in the Siberian Yupik village of Gambell, killing a whale would be a rite of passage, and entry into manhood. But then, Chris Apassingok, age 16, was targeted with online harassment for his kill, and the town of 700 felt the weight of an internet pile-on tear through the community.

4. Brick By Brick

Alice Driver | Arkansas Life | July 1, 2017 | 9 minutes (2,417 words)

In telling stories of the wood-fired kilns her father made by hand over the years, Alice Driver reminds us of the risks and rewards inherent in creative pursuits and the deep personal satisfaction that comes from the effort and sweat you put into your craft.

5. The Selfie Monkey Goes to the Ninth Circuit

Sarah Jeong | Motherboard | July 13, 2017 | 7 minutes (1,804 words)

Can a monkey be an “author” under U.S. copyright law? PETA forges ahead with a claim on behalf of Naruto the macaque, and Sarah Jeong walks us through the details.


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/07/21/the-top-5-longreads-of-the-week-179/

The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week, we’re sharing stories from Abrahm Lustgarten, Lois Beckett, Julia O’Malley, Alice Driver, and Sarah Jeong.

Sign up to receive this list free every Friday in your inbox.

* * *

1. Open Burns, Ill Winds

Abrahm Lustgarten | ProPublica | July 20, 2017 | 38 minutes (9,692 words)

An in-depth report on how munitions plants across America continue to irresponsibly dispose of bomb and bullet waste by “open burning.” The practice, banned 30 years ago, still takes place nearly every day under a permit loophole, putting millions of pounds of toxic chemicals and pollutants into the air, essentially poisoning residents and the environment.

2. The Town Where Everyone Owns a Gun

Lois Beckett | The Guardian & Topic | July 14, 2017 | 20 minutes (5,000 words)

After the mine closed nearby, and the residents started to move out of Nucla, Colorado, the town passed an ordinance that every household in the municipality was required to own a gun. But as the residents see it, their main enemy is Telluride, the liberal city next door.

3. The Teenage Whaler’s Tale

Julia O’Malley | High Country News | July 17, 2017 | 12 minutes (3,000 words)

For a teenager in the Siberian Yupik village of Gambell, killing a whale would be a rite of passage, and entry into manhood. But then, Chris Apassingok, age 16, was targeted with online harassment for his kill, and the town of 700 felt the weight of an internet pile-on tear through the community.

4. Brick By Brick

Alice Driver | Arkansas Life | July 1, 2017 | 9 minutes (2,417 words)

In telling stories of the wood-fired kilns her father made by hand over the years, Alice Driver reminds us of the risks and rewards inherent in creative pursuits and the deep personal satisfaction that comes from the effort and sweat you put into your craft.

5. The Selfie Monkey Goes to the Ninth Circuit

Sarah Jeong | Motherboard | July 13, 2017 | 7 minutes (1,804 words)

Can a monkey be an “author” under U.S. copyright law? PETA forges ahead with a claim on behalf of Naruto the macaque, and Sarah Jeong walks us through the details.


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/07/21/the-top-5-longreads-of-the-week-179/

Scarred by a Rubber Doll

The original piece is a lot to digest. It’s a delicate look at Japanese men who claim they’ve found true love with life-like dolls. But there’s a back story, too. On CorrespondentAlastair Himmer and Tokyo photo chief Behrouz Mehri talk about how they were affected by their work on this story.

You don’t expect to be emotionally scarred by a lifestyle story — and certainly not by a rubber doll. It seemed like such a good idea at the time: write a story that takes a look at the lives of Japanese men and their silicone lovers. I’m AFP’s lifestyle and sports correspondent in Japan and if this wasn’t a lifestyle story, I don’t know what was. I admit that I have previously had odd experiences doing my job. I once ran off the set of a porn shoot. But that was child’s play compared to sex dolls.

But poor Behrouz. He hadn’t been exposed to something like that before. I feel awful about what I did to the Tokyo photo chief. But you have to understand my perspective. It took me nine months to set up this story. You don’t just approach someone on the street and ask them “Can we photograph you and your sex doll.” You make contacts, you get to know the people, you develop trust. I didn’t want to blow all those efforts with some hackneyed, tabloid-style guffaw at Japanese men who go on dates with lifesize dummies. So when Behrouz asked me to ask one of the men, Senji Nakajima, if he could spend the night at his place for the story, I spat coffee all over my shirt. But I asked and Senji agreed and Behrouz went.

Read the story


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/07/21/scarred-by-a-rubber-doll/