How ‘Austin Powers’ Became the First Cult Hit of the DVD Era

No movie channels pre-Millennium, “the end of history is kinda fun!” exuberance better than Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery (1997). The movie, which turned 20 this week, feels incredibly out of step with our ever-more-dystopian present, yet the cheap gags and sophomoric puns still work (also, did you remember Carrie Fisher played the Evils’ family therapist? I didn’t).

At The Hollywood Reporter, Ryan Parker presents the cast and crew’s memories of making this unlikely cult movie — including their growing realization that they had a sleeper, DVD-fueled hit on their hands.

[Director Jay] Roach It opened internationally on the weekend Princess Diana died, and there was no one in the world in the mood for Americans mocking English people. There was some reference to Prince Charles that did end up getting cut for the U.K. release.

[Actor Seth] Green The movie came out and did fine. I think the total take after eight weeks was something like $50 million.

Roach But then DVDs kicked in — they were a new market channel, and Warner Bros. was a pioneer. Mike and I did the commentary and worked on bonus features. They asked us to do a sequel, and I figured the video numbers must have done really well. They hide the video numbers, so you never know. To this day, it’s in the red. I don’t think that movie is listed as in profit, which is hilarious to me.

[Writer and actor Mike] Myers I knew we had something when I was driving on Halloween in Los Angeles and I couldn’t get past Santa Monica Boulevard because of a parade, so I sat on the hood of the car and I saw like 15 Austin Powers go by and one of the Austin Powers spotted me and came over. I had a picture with all these Austin Powers, which was unbelievably cool.

Read the story


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/05/06/austin-powers-oral-history-cult/

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