Is Butter the Future?

In the April issue of Elle magazine, Molly Langmuir questions the societal and dietary norms that preach ‘fat is bad.’ Langmuir spoke with Sally Fallon, who, for two decades, has preached  the health benefits of enjoying animal proteins, organ meats, and raw milk and yogurt (while avoiding all things processed), and reveals that food—like all else—isn’t binary. Enjoying fatty foods doesn’t have to just be a cheat day indulgence.

Raised in Palos Verdes, California, by parents she calls “the original foodies,” Fallon got an English degree at Stanford in 1970 and settled in Washington, DC, with her then husband (they later divorced), who worked in the aerospace industry. “I knew in my bones this low-fat thing was wrong,” she said. But she didn’t have evidence until she read Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, published in 1939 by an intrepid dentist named Weston A. Price, which documented his world travels studying diets and health. His conclusion? Various diseases, cavities, even “personality disturbances,” were rare among groups who ate like their ancestors— lots of meats or seafood, plenty of fat, and, if they ate carbs, whole grains—but rampant among those who’d adopted a modern diet, with heaps of white flour and sugar.

Fallon eventually had four kids and fed them foods like liver and raw milk—she credits this with their continued good health and in 1995 she put Price’s beliefs into practical form in the self-published Nourishing Traditions. At first, Fallon stored the books in her garage and shipped out a few copies a month, but “it started to grow and grow,” she said. Even Atkins blurbed her book, gushing that the first chapter “is so right on target that I feel a little guilty for taking her ideas.” There are now 740,000 copies in print.

Over lunch—a tomato soup into which she’d stirred an entire container of crème fraîche and a dip made from cheese, butter, and cream—she said that at her farm, she does things “the old-fashioned way,” meaning it’s a multispecies realm with pigs that eat the leftover whey, cows that eat the grass, chickens that eat anything they scratch out of the ground, and cats that eat the mice. The living-history–museum vibe carries over into the 150-year-old main house, a precisely decorated three-story affair filled with antique china and Oriental rugs. (There are a few incongruous nods to the present: a swimming pool, a wine fridge.) Fallon does her writing at an enormous antique desk, on which sits a glass paperweight I mistook for a crystal ball. “I don’t see the future,” she said. Then she laughed. “Yes, I do! And it’s butter!”

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from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/04/28/is-butter-the-future/

“In France, I’m a Star”

Tennesseean Sara Estes profiles the man behind her state’s strangest sporting event: Lazarus Lake, aka Gary Cantrell, the creator of the punishing Barkley Marathons. Estes’ piece is a fascinating profile of both the man, the land — “trees like steel bars, thickets like razor wire” — and the community where the Barkley takes place.

When I arrive at Hardee’s, the sun still hasn’t risen, and the air is chilled and dew-damp. Inside, a group of white-haired men — retired, church-going, grandpa types — are seated around a large table in the middle of the restaurant. They’ve been eating breakfast here, every morning, at this very table, since the dawn of fucking time. They can remember all the various phases of branding and décor Hardee’s has cycled through over the decades; they can recount what year the restaurant got new booths, new light fixtures, new flooring. They know the Barkley well, and can always tell its arrival by all the strange new people who flood into the small town around April Fool’s Day, the day on which Laz purposefully chose to host the race, or as near to it as possible.

When Laz arrives, he orders sausage and eggs and joins the men at their roost. Media crews from France and New York are slowly trickling in. They look like aliens from a distant land with their hi-tech AV equipment and tight-fitting athletic wear. Laz ignores them. His particular brand of grungy, mountain-man fame is generally underwhelming to locals, yet ceaselessly exhilarating to clean-cut city dwellers near and far.

“In France, I’m a star,” he tells me. “In America, I’m thought of more as a homeless person.”

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from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/04/28/in-france-im-a-star/

The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week we’re sharing stories by Jason Fagone, Betty Ann Adam, Christian H. Cooper, Clarissa Wei, and Robert Kolker.

Sign up to receive this list free every Friday in your inbox.

* * *

1. What Bullets Do to Bodies

Jason Fagone | Highline — Huffington Post | Apr 26, 2017 | 31 minutes (7,799 words)

What exactly does a bullet do to flesh as it careens through the body? Jason Fagone profiles Philadelphia trauma surgeon Dr. Amy Goldberg, a woman on the front lines of gun violence as she attempts to repair the broken bodies that arrive daily at Temple University Hospital.

2. How I Lost My Mother, Found My Family, Recovered My Identity

Betty Ann Adam | Saskatoon StarPhoenix | Apr 26, 2017 | 15 minutes (3,753 words)

Betty Ann Adam was three years old when she was taken from her mother as part of the “’60s Scoop,” a period spanning 30 years in which Indigenous children in Canada were removed from their homes to be placed with white families as church-run residential schools were closing. “The government’s stated intention with the residential schools was to ‘remove the Indian from the child,’ by removing them from their parents and having them educated by white Christians.” By extension, the ’60s Scoop was another horrific, government-endorsed attempt at cultural genocide.

3. Why Poverty is Like a Disease

Christian H. Cooper | Nautilus | Apr 20, 2017 | 15 minutes (3,858 words)

The emerging science of epigenetics takes the concepts of “meritocracy” and “pulling yourself up by the bootstraps” to task.

4. The Struggles of Writing About Chinese Food as a Chinese Person

Clarissa Wei | Vice Magazine | Apr 24, 2017 | 10 minutes (2,595 words)

Writing about Chinese food lacks cultural context — in part because so few Chinese writers are given the opportunity to publish their stories.

5. This Lawsuit Goes to 11

Robert Kolker | Bloomberg Businessweek | Apr 22, 20177 | 13 minutes (3,428 words)

This Is Spinal Tap is a comedy classic, but its creators made practically no money from it. Robert Kolker looks at the legal battle over what Hollywood owes Harry Shearer, Rob Reiner, Michael McKean, and Christopher Guest.


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/04/28/the-top-5-longreads-of-the-week-167/

The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week we’re sharing stories by Jason Fagone, Betty Ann Adam, Christian H. Cooper, Clarissa Wei, and Robert Kolker.

Sign up to receive this list free every Friday in your inbox.

* * *

1. What Bullets Do to Bodies

Jason Fagone | Highline — Huffington Post | Apr 26, 2017 | 31 minutes (7,799 words)

What exactly does a bullet do to flesh as it careens through the body? Jason Fagone profiles Philadelphia trauma surgeon Dr. Amy Goldberg, a woman on the front lines of gun violence as she attempts to repair the broken bodies that arrive daily at Temple University Hospital.

2. How I Lost My Mother, Found My Family, Recovered My Identity

Betty Ann Adam | Saskatoon StarPhoenix | Apr 26, 2017 | 15 minutes (3,753 words)

Betty Ann Adam was three years old when she was taken from her mother as part of the “’60s Scoop,” a period spanning 30 years in which Indigenous children in Canada were removed from their homes to be placed with white families as church-run residential schools were closing. “The government’s stated intention with the residential schools was to ‘remove the Indian from the child,’ by removing them from their parents and having them educated by white Christians.” By extension, the ’60s Scoop was another horrific, government-endorsed attempt at cultural genocide.

3. Why Poverty is Like a Disease

Christian H. Cooper | Nautilus | Apr 20, 2017 | 15 minutes (3,858 words)

The emerging science of epigenetics takes the concepts of “meritocracy” and “pulling yourself up by the bootstraps” to task.

4. The Struggles of Writing About Chinese Food as a Chinese Person

Clarissa Wei | Vice Magazine | Apr 24, 2017 | 10 minutes (2,595 words)

Writing about Chinese food lacks cultural context — in part because so few Chinese writers are given the opportunity to publish their stories.

5. This Lawsuit Goes to 11

Robert Kolker | Bloomberg Businessweek | Apr 22, 20177 | 13 minutes (3,428 words)

This Is Spinal Tap is a comedy classic, but its creators made practically no money from it. Robert Kolker looks at the legal battle over what Hollywood owes Harry Shearer, Rob Reiner, Michael McKean, and Christopher Guest.


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/04/28/the-top-5-longreads-of-the-week-167/

The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week we’re sharing stories by Jason Fagone, Betty Ann Adam, Christian H. Cooper, Clarissa Wei, and Robert Kolker.

Sign up to receive this list free every Friday in your inbox.

* * *

1. What Bullets Do to Bodies

Jason Fagone | Highline — Huffington Post | Apr 26, 2017 | 31 minutes (7,799 words)

What exactly does a bullet do to flesh as it careens through the body? Jason Fagone profiles Philadelphia trauma surgeon Dr. Amy Goldberg, a woman on the front lines of gun violence as she attempts to repair the broken bodies that arrive daily at Temple University Hospital.

2. How I Lost My Mother, Found My Family, Recovered My Identity

Betty Ann Adam | Saskatoon StarPhoenix | Apr 26, 2017 | 15 minutes (3,753 words)

Betty Ann Adam was three years old when she was taken from her mother as part of the “’60s Scoop,” a period spanning 30 years in which Indigenous children in Canada were removed from their homes to be placed with white families as church-run residential schools were closing. “The government’s stated intention with the residential schools was to ‘remove the Indian from the child,’ by removing them from their parents and having them educated by white Christians.” By extension, the ’60s Scoop was another horrific, government-endorsed attempt at cultural genocide.

3. Why Poverty is Like a Disease

Christian H. Cooper | Nautilus | Apr 20, 2017 | 15 minutes (3,858 words)

The emerging science of epigenetics takes the concepts of “meritocracy” and “pulling yourself up by the bootstraps” to task.

4. The Struggles of Writing About Chinese Food as a Chinese Person

Clarissa Wei | Vice Magazine | Apr 24, 2017 | 10 minutes (2,595 words)

Writing about Chinese food lacks cultural context — in part because so few Chinese writers are given the opportunity to publish their stories.

5. This Lawsuit Goes to 11

Robert Kolker | Bloomberg Businessweek | Apr 22, 20177 | 13 minutes (3,428 words)

This Is Spinal Tap is a comedy classic, but its creators made practically no money from it. Robert Kolker looks at the legal battle over what Hollywood owes Harry Shearer, Rob Reiner, Michael McKean, and Christopher Guest.


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/04/28/the-top-5-longreads-of-the-week-167/

The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week we’re sharing stories by Jason Fagone, Betty Ann Adam, Christian H. Cooper, Clarissa Wei, and Robert Kolker.

Sign up to receive this list free every Friday in your inbox.

* * *

1. What Bullets Do to Bodies

Jason Fagone | Highline — Huffington Post | Apr 26, 2017 | 31 minutes (7,799 words)

What exactly does a bullet do to flesh as it careens through the body? Jason Fagone profiles Philadelphia trauma surgeon Dr. Amy Goldberg, a woman on the front lines of gun violence as she attempts to repair the broken bodies that arrive daily at Temple University Hospital.

2. How I Lost My Mother, Found My Family, Recovered My Identity

Betty Ann Adam | Saskatoon StarPhoenix | Apr 26, 2017 | 15 minutes (3,753 words)

Betty Ann Adam was three years old when she was taken from her mother as part of the “’60s Scoop,” a period spanning 30 years in which Indigenous children in Canada were removed from their homes to be placed with white families as church-run residential schools were closing. “The government’s stated intention with the residential schools was to ‘remove the Indian from the child,’ by removing them from their parents and having them educated by white Christians.” By extension, the ’60s Scoop was another horrific, government-endorsed attempt at cultural genocide.

3. Why Poverty is Like a Disease

Christian H. Cooper | Nautilus | Apr 20, 2017 | 15 minutes (3,858 words)

The emerging science of epigenetics takes the concepts of “meritocracy” and “pulling yourself up by the bootstraps” to task.

4. The Struggles of Writing About Chinese Food as a Chinese Person

Clarissa Wei | Vice Magazine | Apr 24, 2017 | 10 minutes (2,595 words)

Writing about Chinese food lacks cultural context — in part because so few Chinese writers are given the opportunity to publish their stories.

5. This Lawsuit Goes to 11

Robert Kolker | Bloomberg Businessweek | Apr 22, 20177 | 13 minutes (3,428 words)

This Is Spinal Tap is a comedy classic, but its creators made practically no money from it. Robert Kolker looks at the legal battle over what Hollywood owes Harry Shearer, Rob Reiner, Michael McKean, and Christopher Guest.


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/04/28/the-top-5-longreads-of-the-week-167/

The Top 5 Longreads of the Week

This week we’re sharing stories by Jason Fagone, Betty Ann Adam, Christian H. Cooper, Clarissa Wei, and Robert Kolker.

Sign up to receive this list free every Friday in your inbox.

* * *

1. What Bullets Do to Bodies

Jason Fagone | Highline — Huffington Post | Apr 26, 2017 | 31 minutes (7,799 words)

What exactly does a bullet do to flesh as it careens through the body? Jason Fagone profiles Philadelphia trauma surgeon Dr. Amy Goldberg, a woman on the front lines of gun violence as she attempts to repair the broken bodies that arrive daily at Temple University Hospital.

2. How I Lost My Mother, Found My Family, Recovered My Identity

Betty Ann Adam | Saskatoon StarPhoenix | Apr 26, 2017 | 15 minutes (3,753 words)

Betty Ann Adam was three years old when she was taken from her mother as part of the “’60s Scoop,” a period spanning 30 years in which Indigenous children in Canada were removed from their homes to be placed with white families as church-run residential schools were closing. “The government’s stated intention with the residential schools was to ‘remove the Indian from the child,’ by removing them from their parents and having them educated by white Christians.” By extension, the ’60s Scoop was another horrific, government-endorsed attempt at cultural genocide.

3. Why Poverty is Like a Disease

Christian H. Cooper | Nautilus | Apr 20, 2017 | 15 minutes (3,858 words)

The emerging science of epigenetics takes the concepts of “meritocracy” and “pulling yourself up by the bootstraps” to task.

4. The Struggles of Writing About Chinese Food as a Chinese Person

Clarissa Wei | Vice Magazine | Apr 24, 2017 | 10 minutes (2,595 words)

Writing about Chinese food lacks cultural context — in part because so few Chinese writers are given the opportunity to publish their stories.

5. This Lawsuit Goes to 11

Robert Kolker | Bloomberg Businessweek | Apr 22, 20177 | 13 minutes (3,428 words)

This Is Spinal Tap is a comedy classic, but its creators made practically no money from it. Robert Kolker looks at the legal battle over what Hollywood owes Harry Shearer, Rob Reiner, Michael McKean, and Christopher Guest.


from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/04/28/the-top-5-longreads-of-the-week-167/