Searching for the Lost on Public Land

After the September 11 ­attacks, Interior tried to build its own data­base to track law-enforcement actions across lands managed by the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bureau of Indian Affairs. (The Forest Service is under the Department of Agriculture.) The result, the ­Incident Management Analysis and Reporting System, is a $50 million Database to Nowhere—last year, only 14 percent of the several hundred reportable incidents were entered into it. The system is so flawed that Fish and Wildlife has said no thanks and refuses to use it.

That leaves the only estimates to civilians and conspiracy theorists. Aficionados of the vanished believe that at least 1,600 people, and perhaps many times that number, ­remain missing on public lands under circumstances that defy easy explanation.

On America’s 640 million areas of national forests, national parks, and Bureau of Land Management property, people regularly disappear. One 18-year old runner’s disappearance in Colorado sent Outside journalist Jon Billman investigating the sheriffs, trackers, amateur detectives, and mourning families who search for the people who go missing in the wild.

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from Longreads https://longreads.com/2017/03/21/searching-for-the-lost-on-public-land/

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